STEP 13

STEP 13. POLISHING THE MAP

The 3D map may now be polished (see step 15 for subsequent updating the map). This requires adding key components of all maps on the P3DM and protecting it.

13.1 Map components

The  3D  map  should  include  the  following  components  so  that  reading is  easy,  especially  for  members  of  the  community  which  have  not participated in the P3DM activities. These component are also essential for eventually integrating scientific knowledge and supporting integration of the community-based DRR plan into municipal activities.

Title – this is the chosen title of the 3D map with the name of the village. It may be painted or designed by the participants on a piece of wood or polystyrene. It should be visible and large enough to be seen at first sight (Figure 57).

Figure 57:  Participants carving the name of their village for 3D map in Mondulkiri, Cambodia (JC  Gaillard, January, 2011)

Figure 57: Participants carving the name of their village for 3D map in Mondulkiri, Cambodia (JC Gaillard, January, 2011)

Legend – the temporary pieces of cartons or polystyrene which have been used  during  the  mapping  activities  (see  step  7)  should  be  replaced  by  a clean and integrated list of symbols which appear on the 3D map (Figure 58).

The  legend  may  be  written  or  painted  directly  onto  the  map  with  the appropriate  push  pins,  yarns  and  paints.  Alternatively,  a  picture  of  the actual legend may be used to make sure than no symbols get lost during transport or final set up. The legend should be in the local language and may include drawings or pictures for those who can not read.

Figure 58: Polishing the legend of a 3D map in Borongan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, August 2007)

Figure 58: Polishing the legend of a 3D map in Borongan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, August 2007)

Scale – the scale should be represented as a graphic scale, meaning a line marked with distance on the ground (Figure 59). A numeral scale such as 1:1000  may  not  really  be  understandable  for  the  participants.  A  scale  of 1:1000 cm means 1 cm is equivalent to 1000 cm or 10 m. This means that a line with a length of 10 cm is equivalent 100 m. This 10 cm line (equivalent to 100 m on the ground) can be painted on the 3D map in a sequence of black and white (or other culturally relevant colored) 1 cm blocks (equivalent to 10 m). In some non-Western context, the scale may not be metric and refer to time or other references.

Orientation – as mentioned in step 4 the orientation may follow the Western system of cardinal points or any other locally relevant pattern. In any case the  orientation  of  the  3D  map  has  to  be  clearly  indicated  to  make  sure that  the  map  is  properly  oriented  even  if  it  is  moved  from  one  place  to another. This can be through an arrow pointing to the north or whatever other symbol (Figure 59).

Figure 59: Scale and orientation of a 3D map in Irosin, Philippines (JC Gaillard, January 2010)

Figure 59: Scale and orientation of a 3D map in Irosin, Philippines (JC Gaillard, January 2010)

Grid and coordinates – this is optional and may only serve a purpose if there is a future plan to integrate the data on the 3D map into a GIS (see step 14). The grid is placed on top of the 3D map using distinct yarns stretched across  the  map  (Figure  60).  Obviously  this  proves  difficult  of  the  terrain is mountainous. In that case, the yarns have to carefully follow the relief while maintaining the proper direction.

Figure 60:  Grid affixed on top of a 3D map in Borongan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, August 2007)

Figure 60: Grid affixed on top of a 3D map in Borongan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, August 2007)

In addition to these cartographic musts it is suggested to include the names and group photograph of the participants in order to enhance their sense of ownership. It also often raises pride amongst those who built the map so that they care for it afterwards.

13.2 Protection measures for the 3D map

In order to ensure the safety of the information on the 3D map, it has to be properly covered. Depending on the resources of the community (or the source of funding), the following materials can be used as a cover:

  1. Plastic cover – this can be an immediate and cheap material to cover the map (Figure 61). However, this may have to be replaced from time to time depending on the local conditions.

    Figure 61: 3D map covered with plastic sheets in Mercedes, Philippines (JC Gaillard, December 2012)

    Figure 61: 3D map covered with plastic sheets in Mercedes, Philippines (JC Gaillard, December 2012)

  2. Glass or fiberglass cover – this is a much more expensive and a bit fragile (for glass) option but the beauty of the 3D map is certainly enhanced and display is easy (Figure 62). The map may further serve as table.

    Figure 62: Glass case covering a 3D map in Dagupan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, July 2009)

    Figure 62: Glass case covering a 3D map in Dagupan, Philippines (JC Gaillard, July 2009)

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